It sometimes seems like the terms “job,” “occupation,” and “career” mean the same thing. Erin First, principal at Brick Lane, a boutique PR agency, started applying for jobs and doing interviews while still employed, but felt that dividing her energy between both tasks wasn’t working out. It didn’t feel fair to the company I was working for, and it would have limited the time I was able to spend charting my next move,” says First, who quit her job without having another one lined up, freeing up her time to do a thorough job search.

Enter keywords, locations or job types to start searching for your new science career. Work is anything where you expend effort, whether paid or not. A job can be either a piece of work, or an activity for which you are paid. A career is a lifetime progression of paid occupation. A profession is a career with high status and one requiring training, often at degree level. Occupation is usually a paid job, whether professional or not.

In simple terms, job is a position of regular employment, that is paid. Conversely, career implies progress of an individual in a particular profession or in a company. When young people work part-time in retail sales jobs, they aren’t thinking of it as a career. Our employees start out their careers at Gallegos as apprentices. What that means is that you are mentored in the field as well as take classes to learn the basics and beyond. But unlike traditional classroom environments, you earn your hourly wage while you learn.

Getting to know your work values can help set you up for a successful job search—and so can we. Could you use some help kick-starting your search? Join Monster today. As a member, you can upload up to five versions of your resume—each tailored to the types of jobs that interest you. Recruiters search Monster every day looking to fill top jobs with qualified candidates, just like you. Additionally, you can get job alerts sent directly to your inbox so you can apply as soon as something catches your eye. Find a company that brings out the best in you.

The following resources are only a fraction of the available job search resources in the Chicago area. These groups provide support and expertise in assisting the job seeker with resume writing, interviewing skills, networking, and job leads. While some have a cost associated with membership in their group, most are free or very low cost. Many meet at or are sponsored by a church, but all job seekers are welcome. Often a contact with the groups listed below (or their websites) will lead you to other groups that are geographically convenient to you.

Three Key Elements Of A Successful Job Search Mindset
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